Sharing Mathematics 2015

  • Date: 05/14/2015
Speaker(s):
Lisa Lajeunesse (Capilano University) Math and the Creative Arts

Lin Hammill (Kwantlen Polytechnic University) Creating classroom materials based on research in teaching/learning

Eric Agyekum (Vancouver Island University) From Puzzles to the Poetry of Patterns - a course for math phobic Humanities students

David Bigelow (Vancouver Island University) A Problem Solving course for upper level students

Lev Idels (Vancouver Island University) A Math History for Teachers
Location: 

Vancouver Island University, Nanaimo, BC. building 356, room 319

Topic: 

Stimulating Engagement Among Undergradutes

Description: 

Registration for this conference is free and optional, but would help with organizing.

 

 

 

Online registration is available here.

Schedule:
09:00 - 09:10 Welcome, Announcements

09:10 - 10:40 Lisa Lajeunesse Math and the Creative Arts

10:40 - 11:00 Break

11:00 - 12:00 Lin Hammill Creating Classroom Materials that Work

12:00 - 13:00 Lunch (no host)

13:00 - 13:30 Eric Agyekum From Puzzles to the Poetry of Patterns - a Course for Math Phobic Humanities Students

13:35 - 14:05 Lev Idels A Math History for Teachers

14:10 - 14:40 David Bigelow A Problem Solving Course for Upper Level Students

14:40 - 15:00 Wrap up
Organizers: 

For more information, please contact

Other Information: hide

Abstracts

Eric Agyekum (Vancouver Island University)

From Puzzles to the Poetry of Patterns

 

The presentation gives a brief overview of VIU's Math 135 - From Puzzles to the Poetry of Patterns. VIU has been offering this course since 2009. The objective of the course is to "gently" introduce "mathphobics" to College / University level math courses.

 

 

David Bigelow (Vancouver Island University)

A Problem Solving Course for Upper Level Students

 

VIU's Math 360 is a course designed to enhance the creativity and problem solving skills of our upper level students. The talk will explore the overall design of the course and the many challenges involved in teaching a class with a clear goal but no clear curriculum.

 

 

Lin Hammill (Kwantlen Polytechnic University)

Creating Classroom Materials that Work

 

Most of us produce a variety of materials for the classroom: handouts, overhead or PowerPoint slides, course manuals and problem sets. This talk will focus on how an understanding of research in learning and cognition, communication, and graphic design can be used to make classroom materials more effective. We will see how research findings can be applied to the organization of content, the use of graphical illustrations, and increased accessibility and approachability through graphic design.

 

 

Lev Idels (Vancouver Island University)

A Math History for Teachers

 

The VIU Department of Mathematics runs one 3-credit undergraduate module on the history of mathematics. This runs every other year, and is taken by students in either their third or fourth year. The module is one of our most popular and students take the module because it will provide an interesting contrast with their other courses. Student feedback is usually excellent. Recent topics have included Ancient Mathematics, Number Systems, History of Math Symbols and Constants, and Brilliant Discoveries: Ten Great Theorems of Mathematics.

 

 

Lisa Lajeunesse (Capilano University)

Math and the Creative Arts

Math and the Creative Arts is a course developed at Capilano University to highlight connections between mathematics and the arts, including visual art, music, film, dance, literature and other arts disciplines. We will give an overview of the course with a glimpse at some student projects, and present one or two course topics with activities.

 

 

Jim Bailey (College of the Rockies)

Ill-Tempered Tunings, Mean Tones, and the Big Bad Wolf!

 

Around 500 BCE Pythagoras discoverd that frequencies which are in the ratio of small integers are pleasing to the ear and pleasant to the soul. In this talk I will explore some of the implications of this discovery, the problems which it causes when tuning a musical instrument, and the mean trick which Nature played on Pythagoras: the Fundamental Theorem of Arithmetic.